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Backpacking Hikes

Kalalau: 2 Day Coastal Hike along Kauai’s Na Pali

Over Spring break, Ikaika and I decided to hike Hawaii’s best known trail: Kalalau. The trail is 11 miles long one way and ends at a famous camp spot. Originally planned as a 4 day and 3 night event, we ended up shortening it to 2 days and 1 night while still completing all of the 22 miles, camping at the beach, visiting one of the major waterfalls, and capturing the Milky Way along the way.

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Sights

Peeking Into The Waiakanaloa Wet Cave

Located beyond the Maniholo dry cave is another one of Kauai’s north shore landmarks, the Waiakanaloa wet cave. This wet cave is located just before the Ke’e Beach parking lot. Waikanaloa, meaning water of Kanaloa, and its neighbor, Waikapalae, are said to have been dug by the goddess of fire, Pele. During a recent visit to Kauai, we decided to drive to the end of Highway 56 / Kuhio HIghway. At the very is end of the highway is Ke’e Beach and, more importantly, the trailhead to the famous eleven-mile long Kalalau Trail.

Categories
Sights

Maniniholo Dry Cave On Kauai’s North Shore

The Maniholo dry cave makes for a short and fun stop if traveling to the north shore of Kauai. The cave is located at the bottom of Kaiwikui Ridge and across from Haena Beach Park. Maniniholo means “travelling reef surgeonfish.” You’ll often times here locals refer to small fish, or small things in general, as being “manini.” According to legend, Maniniholo was the name of the head fisherman of the area during the time the menehunes were leaving the island (Wichman, 1998). Apparently, a few of these little imps were caught stealing food from the fisherman and were subsequently killed. The rest of the menehune, well, jumped on their canoes at Makua Bay and was never seen again.