A Return To Sushi Sasabune

Last month, we celebrated Joel’s birthday by dining at my favorite sushi restaurant on the island, Sushi Sasabune. As per our birthday celebration tradition, the birthday boy got to choose, and he chose well. Of course, we did the omakase, there’s no better way to do Sasabune other than to sit at the sushi bar and wait in anticipation for whatever it is that the sushi chef will present next.

Here’s the breakdown of our Omakase:

  1. Canadian albacore, Japanese blue fin tuna with ponzu sauce and green onions, lemon, and garlic
  2. Stuffed California squid with Louisiana blue crab and eel sauce
  3. Japanese blue fin tuna with dashi shoyu and condensed soy sauce
  4. Thai snapper and North Carolina halibut with green onion, wasabi, and roe
  5. Japanese yellowtail and Japanese Papio
  6. Japanese Hokkaido scallops with green paste (yuzu kosho)
  7. King salmon with white kelp and sesame seeds
  8. Baked Pacific oyster, Kushi oyster from Seattle, and salmon caviar
  9. Japanese mackerel and Blue caledonia shrimp
  10. Japanese aku and Japanese snow crab with innards and mayo
  11. Negitoro, finely chopped with scallions
  12. Baked lobster tail from South Africa
  13. Eel on egg omelet
  14. Blue Crab roll
  15. Santa Barbara uni
  16. Red bean and Green Tea Ice Cream

To start, we were served fresh albacore and blue fun tuna sashimi that was bathed in ponzu sauce and topped with green onions, lemon, and garlic. What a way to kick off dinner.

Canadian albacore, Japanese blue fin tuna with ponzu sauce and green onions, lemon, and garlic.

Canadian albacore, Japanese blue fin tuna with ponzu sauce and green onions, lemon, and garlic.

One of my favorite dishes in Sasabune’s omakase is the squid stuffed with blue crab. Such a delicate, yet delicious dish. In the days leading up to this dinner, this was probably the dish that I was looking forward to the most. 

Stuffed California squid with Louisiana blue crab with eel sauce.

Stuffed California squid with Louisiana blue crab with eel sauce.

You've got to savor it.

You’ve got to savor it.

It really does just keep getting better, and better. At Sasabune, you aren’t allowed to use shoyu on your own. Instead, the chef will delicately brush the shoyu on for you.

The artist gets his brush ready.

The artist gets his brush ready.

If there was any way that I could eat this photo, I would.

If there was any way that I could eat this photo, I would.

Brush carefully.

Brush carefully.

Japanese Blue fin tuna with dashi shoyu and condensed soy sauce.

Japanese Blue fin tuna with dashi shoyu and condensed soy sauce.

Now for something a little different, some snapper and halibut.

Thai Snapper and North Carolina halibut with green onion, wasabi, and roe.

Thai Snapper and North Carolina halibut with green onion, wasabi, and roe.

The sushi chef introduced this dish by mentioning that it was everyone’s favorite. Of course, it was hamachi – my definitive favorite! The papio was lightly seared to give it a smoky flavor.

Japanese yellowtail and Japanese Papio.

Japanese yellowtail and Japanese Papio.

If I could, I would eat all of that.

If I could, I would eat all of that.

That salmon…

King salmon with white kelp and sesame seeds and Japanese Hokkaido scallop with green paste (yuzu kosho).

King salmon with white kelp and sesame seeds and Japanese Hokkaido scallop with green paste (yuzu kosho).

Another signature Sasabune omakase dish. The roe, they just pop in your mouth and ooze juicy deliciousness. That baked oyster, oh my that baked oyster.

Baked Pacific oyster, Kushi oyster from Seattle, and salmon caviar.

Baked Pacific oyster, Kushi oyster from Seattle, and salmon caviar.

Writing this post is torture, because I want to eat all of this all over again.

Writing this post is torture, because I want to eat all of this all over again.

Probably my least favorite dish in the omakase. I’m not the biggest fan of raw shrimp.

Japanese mackerel and Blue caledonia shrimp.

Japanese mackerel and Blue caledonia shrimp.

That sauce on top of the snow crab is ace.

Japanese aku and Japanese snow crab topped with innards and mayo.

Japanese aku and Japanese snow crab topped with innards and mayo.

This is probably THE signature dish in the Sasabune omakase, the negitoro. Finely chopped raw fatty tuna topped with scallions. This will melt in your mouth.

Negitoro, finely chopped with scallions.

Negitoro, finely chopped with scallions.

And the deliciousness keeps coming!

Baked lobster tail from South Africa.

Baked lobster tail from South Africa.

Nearing the end. That egg omelet is pancake fluffy.

Eel on egg omelet.

Eel on egg omelet.

Getting a blue crab roll at the end was a bit anticlimactic, but hey, I’m not complaining! Everything was so damn good.

Blue crab roll.

Blue crab roll. Tuna roll.

This was a nice addition to our omakase, Santa Barbara uni, or, sea urchin. Uni is definitely an acquired taste. I’ve grown to be fan of fresh uni. Be prepared when you bite into this one.

Santa Barbara uni.

Santa Barbara uni.

A nice way to end the evening, green tea and red bean ice cream.

Green tea and red bean ice cream.

Green tea and red bean ice cream.

I’m pretty sure Joel enjoyed his meal. Now, I hear there’s this Eastern Omakase menu that you can request. Hmmm, I might have to make yet another return trip to Sushi Sasabune.

Happy sushi eaters.

Happy sushi eaters.

Sushi Sasabune
1417 S King St
Honolulu, HI 96814
(808) 947-3800

About Coty

Founder of Exploration: Hawaii. Adventure, Minimalism, Vinyl, Typography, and Coffee + Matcha. A single space after a period, please.

2 comments

  1. Wow, what gorgeous, beautiful, delicious food. Great post. Now I’m going to go read the one about Koko Head Cafe! Can’t wait to have brunch there.
    Aloha!

    • Thanks Monica! Glad you enjoyed post and the photos! We usually have a new foodie post every Monday or Tuesday. Also, check out the Orchids lunch post too, some delicious pics there as well 🙂

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