Peeking Into The Waiakanaloa Wet Cave

Located beyond the Maniholo dry cave is another one of Kauai’s north shore landmarks, the Waiakanaloa wet cave. This wet cave is located just before the Ke’e Beach parking lot. Waikanaloa, meaning water of Kanaloa, and its neighbor, Waikapalae, are said to have been dug by the goddess of fire, Pele. During a recent visit to Kauai, we decided to drive to the end of Highway 56 / Kuhio HIghway. At the very is end of the highway is Ke’e Beach and, more importantly, the trailhead to the famous eleven-mile long Kalalau Trail.

Our original plan was to actually hike a portion of the Kalalau Trail to Hanakapiai Valley and the Hanakapiai waterfall. Unfortunately for us, the weather was not cooperating. Flash flood conditions forced the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) to close the trail to hikers. It’s a good thing that we didn’t hike that day, considering that 12 people had to be airlifted out of Hanakapi’ai after being stranded in the valley overnight. There’s always next time!

Explorers: Coty Gonzales and Joel Sabugo.

Directions to the Maniholo Dry Cave:¬†From Kapaa, you want to head north on Highway 56 / Kuhio Highway and drive toward Ke’e Beach Park. The cave is located just before the Ke’e Beach parking lot and will be on your left.

Do you see it? Photo by Joel Sabugo.

Do you see it? Photo by Joel Sabugo.

Waiakanaloa Cave. Photo by Coty Gonzales.

Waiakanaloa Cave. Photo by Coty Gonzales.

Black hole. Photo by Joel Sabugo.

Black hole. Photo by Joel Sabugo.

Spider. Photo by Joel Sabugo.

Spider. Photo by Joel Sabugo.

No swimming. Photo by Coty Gonzales.

No swimming. Photo by Coty Gonzales.

Outside looking. Photo by Coty Gonzales.

Outside looking. Photo by Coty Gonzales.

Tourist. Photo by Coty Gonzales.

Tourist. Photo by Coty Gonzales.

About Coty

Founder of Exploration: Hawaii. Adventure, Minimalism, Vinyl, Typography, and Coffee + Matcha. A single space after a period, please.